Words of Wisdom

Various members of the community explain the best piece of advice they have ever been given.

Melanie Salazar, Student Life Editor

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The world is filled with ever-changing ideas, concepts, and socially acceptable standards. It can be inconsistent, sometimes a little ridiculous, and other times, completely alter our perspective. With this loudness, it can lead to confusion. Confusion of our own morals, ethics, beliefs…and that can be kind of dangerous. 

However, at the end of the day, how we act, what we pursue, and what we believe ultimately comes down to the information we have been given, and how important we think it to be. Advice from parents, friends, teachers, and sometimes even celebrities can be something we perceive as significantly influential to us. This lead me to wondering more or less, what that is to people around me. Not sure whether to expect something deep or short and simple, I asked one question: What is the best piece of advice you have ever been given?

 

“Think before you speak.”

 

Senior Dietrich Campos’ best advice is a rather common said one. Most of us heard it from our parents at least 15 times, maybe more. Yet, it stays in his mind as a phrase he uses to his utmost advantage. 

“I think it’s advice that spills over into every aspect of life. Well thought out decisions are the best decisions,” Campos said.

 

“Work from rest, don’t just rest from work or you’ll get burnt out.”

 

The next piece of advice, applying more to one’s mental health, comes from teacher Meghan Perry, told to her by a close friend. She believes this piece of advice to be applicable to any activity.

“It can apply to cleaning, the bills, or even a job,” Perry said. 

The phrase focuses on understanding too much of anything without pause can lead to a lack of motivation in continuing it, or perhaps putting full effort into other activities as well. 

 

“Other people’ success is not your failures.”

 

Sophomore Aya Kasim believes this phrase which teacher Megan Perry shared with her, refers to the fact that, although it is inevitable in life to bear witness to other people’s achievements, it is not the absence of one’s own success.

 A member of various clubs such as UIL, debate, and student council, she explained “When other people receive awards, it can make me think I’m not good enough for those same achievements,” Kasim said.

 However, it is important to her to keep in mind certain achievements are not meant for everyone. 

“Everyone has a different path. Sometimes they might cross, but they are never the same,” Kasim said. 

 

“You can be the sweetest, juiciest peach in the world and there will still be someone who doesn’t like peaches”. 

 

Senior Analeise Zapata explained this advice came from her mother during a conversation about Zapata’s uncertainty in her writing, and how it would sadden her to not be confident in her own writing ability. 

However, this phrase refers to the notion that no matter how perfectly one does something, there will still be the one, or even many, who do not like it, and that is okay. Rather than aiming for the impossible goal of pleasing everyone, one should aim to act and do things in a way they themselves are proud of. 

 

“Don’t make excuses”

 

 Senior Jacob Davis shared how these three words have had great impact on his perseverance through times where it would have been easier to just give up.

“It influenced my life the most when I broke my neck. I was so ready to give up on track and powerlifting,” Davis said, yet today he is a dedicated member of both teams.

 Advice given by seniors Gianmarcos Villafane and Spencer Payne, whom Davis claims are two of his biggest motivators, was described as especially meaningful at that difficult point in his life. 

Life can be loud. We are fed advice, information, and stories every day. However, it is important to have a few phrases that set the example for the way we want to live. If you notice, none of these pieces of advice are about money, business, or even grades. On the contrary, they encompass virtues like perseverance, gratitude, and confidence. Despite the various ideas society tries to push on people to achieve happiness, diets, expensive clothes, relationships, it ultimately comes down to a contentment in the way we live. And sometimes, it is other people’s words that can aid us in getting there.